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Zach Randolph's House Searched After Drug Dealer Was Allegedly Beaten With Pool Cues

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What a crazy story this is. 

It appears that Zach Randolph might have gotten himself into a little trouble this weekend after his Portland mansion was searched by the police thanks to some riffraff . The story goes, an alleged invited guest to Randolph's house was beaten with pool cues by some of Z=Bo's guests. The reason? He was trying to sell some marijuana. It sounds a little sketchy to me, and the good news, at least, is that Randolph himself has not been arrested. 

I suppose this is where we wait for "more information" to be released. Again, the good news is that Randolph has NOT been arrested. At the very least, it sounds like he'd only deserve a slap on the wrist after some partygoers at his house beat up a dude trying to sell drugs. On the Randolph trouble scale, this is J.J. Redick soft. 

Details

STAFFORD -- Police say the latest chapter in basketball star Zach Randolph's colorful life began Friday night, aboard a special charter cruise of the Portland Spirit, which got under way on the Willamette River at 11 p.m. 

That's where police say Randolph, a former Trail Blazer now playing for the Memphis Grizzlies, met a Southeast Portland man selling marijuana and invited him to Randolph's mansion on Southwest Turner Road,  in the Stafford area south of West Linn, for an after-cruise party. The Portland man,  James Ruben Beasley, told police he was encouraged to sell marijuana to anyone interested among the 20 or so people at the party.

But something went wrong around 4 a.m. Saturday. 

"Mr. Beasley said four to seven people jumped him and beat him bloody with pool cues," said Sgt. James Rhodes, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office spokesman. 

But Beasley didn't call 9-1-1. Instead, he left and went to a local hospital, where he was treated for head wounds and released. 

At 2 p.m. Saturday, he called police....

"He said he knew Zach Randolph and that he was not involved," Rhodes said. "Therefore, he was not a suspect."