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Jeremy Lin Owns Rights to 'Linsanity,' Should Tony Allen Trademark 'Grit And Grind'?

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Mar 21, 2012; Philadelphia, PA, USA; New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin (17) during the first quarter against the Philadelphia 76ers at the Wells Fargo Center. The Knicks defeated the Sixers 82-79. Mandatory Credit: Howard Smith-US PRESSWIRE
Mar 21, 2012; Philadelphia, PA, USA; New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin (17) during the first quarter against the Philadelphia 76ers at the Wells Fargo Center. The Knicks defeated the Sixers 82-79. Mandatory Credit: Howard Smith-US PRESSWIRE

Congratulations to Jeremy Lin who became the proud owner of the "Linsanity" trademark. Now, the dude is going to get some serious bankroll for what has become one of the more recognizable brands in the game.

According to Newsday (via Pro Basketball Talk):

"Linsanity" belongs to Jeremy Lin. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has registered the term for Lin, who in February moved to take control of the catchphrase that encapsulated his meteoric rise from undrafted player to starter.

Lin’s filing Feb. 13 came six days after a California man with no ties to the Knicks guard became the first to apply for a Linsanity trademark. A second filing was made Feb. 9 and another Feb. 14.

Well, that got me thinking. Should Tony Allen go and get the famed "Grit and Grind" phrase trademarked? Sure, it doesn't have the same mass appeal as "Linsanity," but locally it's what we eat for breakfast.

Now, I'm not here to give Allen any advice, but I think he should look into it. Well, as long as SoV gets a small cut -- hey, we've got a family to feed... whoops! That's a Latrell Sprewell trademark. Strike that last comment.